Sunday, September 23, 2007

And for those who want to know more . . .

It's almost time. Stores across the country will be stocking shelves with copies of Look Me in the Eye tomorrow, in anticipation of Tuesday's opening. A few stores - the ones who got their shipments Saturday - may even have it out for sale.

Readers are always curious about the authors, hiding back there, behind their books. There’s more and more material about me popping up every day online. Two weeks ago, a Google search on “John Elder Robison” found 820 hits. Today, it finds 22,000. I’ve selected a few of the more thoughtful pieces this morning.

Over on the right sidebar of the Look Me in the Eye blog, there’s a button to read “what the critics are saying” on my website. I’ll embed it here for those of you who read syndicated feeds - http://www.johnrobison.com/theysay.asp But those are just brief word bites from the big magazines. Some folks want to know more. And for you, I have a few articles . . .

Ann Treneman of The Times of London came to America to interview me for this story, which ran in last Saturday’s magazine. They had a wonderful 7-page spread with full page color photography. The Internet version does not do it justice.

I hope I’m not as eccentric as she makes me seem . . .

For a very nice review with a mother and writer's point of view, read what blogger Kanani Fong has to say

Here’s an interview I did with Library Journal Magazine. I especially like the question about James Taylor at the end.

Libraries pay attention to the Journal, and thanks to them and a few others, you'll be finding my book in libraries everywhere.

Here’s a story about me by my friend Alison. Our kids grew up together in town . . .

Blogger Kelly Hewitt posted a thoughtful interview just last week, on her Loaded Shelf site.

Finally, the Boston Globe will be running a story on me in the Arts section. Check tomorrow’s paper for more . . .

And if this isn’t enough . . . come to one of my appearances and ask your questions in person. And watch me with Amy Robach on Weekend Today next Saturday, the 29th. The following Tuesday I'll be with Diane Rehm on National Public Radio, and there's a lot more to come. Stay tuned for media updates later this week.

28 comments:

Belfast said...

Question (pardon if it's answered already-though I don't know where):
Do you really wiggle your ears (as the line preceding comments says) ?
Ask only because I wiggle my ears, which is considered unusual-and I wondered whether your reference to doing so was literal.
Look forward to the book, have reserved it from local library (which has it listed as "on order").
What will you be doing at the AANE conference ? Will you be a speaker/presenter or mingling with attendees (or both) ?

John Elder Robison said...

I could wiggle my ears as a child but sadly I've lost that ability in the past 40 years.

I will be walking around the AANE event Friday and signing books at some point in the day . . . check the program or ask at the booth where they're selling books. Tell me, and then we'll both know!

Merelyme said...

hey i saw a review of your book in Elle magazine and it was quite favorable! i can't wait to read your book!

Casdok said...

I will look out for it to!

ORION said...

Very cool articles John but now I'm disappointed as I honestly thought you could wriggle your ears.

Kim Stagliano said...

John, can a reality TV show be far behind? Look out Ozzy Osbourne! Here come the Robisons! Enjoy the week. It's finally here!

Kanani said...

Hi John,
Thanks for the recognition. It's really nice to hear good things.

I guess I was uniquely suited for this "yob." I trained as a public policy advocate --so shooting my mouth off and also seeing great talent is something I've got experience in.

On Monday, I'll have something up on my blog for you & your friends to celebrate the occassion.

I am very grateful to Patricia Wood, author of "Lottery" for introducing us. I think "Lottery" and "Look Me In The Eye" have been the most memorable books I've read this year --and I read an incredible amount.

WWOOOOOFFFFFFFF BOW WOOWWW....

John Elder Robison said...

WOOF to you too. I don't do Bow Wow. Just woof.

crysnrob said...

This is getting too exciting. You'll be happy to know that I'm telling our whole school staff about this book too!

Too bad I don't see Indy on your scheduled appearances yet...

The Writers' Group said...

John, here's to making another dream come true. I'll buy my copy at Buttonwood Books in Cohasset when you do your reading there. Can't wait!

Amy

Ps- I can wiggle my ears.

Demon Hunter said...

Congratulations, John. I'm sure you know you'll be a bestseller. This is great stuff. I cannot wait to get my copy. Hopefully you'll get close enough to S.C. so that you can sign my copy...

Laura said...

Congrats on all the great press, John! Oh, and I bet you could relearn to wiggle your ears if you just focused on exercising them. I think they're like any muscle in the body - if you don't use the muscles that move your ears, they'll just end up flabby, and who needs flabby ears? ;) That said, I can really only wiggle my right ear. My left just hangs there, hearing things.

Holly Kennedy said...

So tomorrow's the big day, huh?
Exciting stuff, John. Congrats on all the great reviews so far. I've no doubt they'll keep rolling in!

P.S. I like Kim's idea.
You and Augusten in a reality series titled "Authors on Tour". It'd be great!

John Elder Robison said...

Well, Holly and Kim, the first stewp toward reality TV happens next week when the TV crews come to film at Robison Service.

And check tomorrow's Boston Globe, in the A&E section, to see what they have to say . . .

Kanani said...

Just don't throw a ham at the neighbors.

David said...

John, I just happened upon a review of your new book in my wife's People magazine. It stuck out like a Lighthouse in the Fog for me. Normally, I would have passed on this subject, but I have a personal attachment now to Aspergers.

I helped run a Cub Scout Daycamp this summer and ran across a young boy named John who had Aspergers. John could be best described as a typical 8 year old, however he was particularly difficult to deal with compared to the other boys. It wasn't until the start of the 4th day that I found out he had Aspergers. You see, John's parents didn't put down that he had Aspergers on his medical form, nor did they notify me until I called the father and encouraged him to tell me what I had suspected all week.

Up until that moment I hadn't worked with a child with any form of Autism. I didn't know anything about Aspergers, so I googled it and found some important information that helped me understand John better. You see, at a day camp, children are rushed from station to station every hour (transitioned) and are forced to work with/fit in with their group of kids. I was very patient with John and after finding out that he had Aspergers I immediately let him know that I knew, and that it didn't change anything other than my understanding of Aspergers. From that day on, we had a great time and John opened up to me about some very personal struggles he's had to overcome and is still dealing with. John's parents are also struggling with this new discovery as they didn't find out that he had Aspergers until several months ago. John is 8 years old and a very intelligent young man. I can't wait to get this book and read more about you and your life so that I share it with John and his family! Thank you sir, for sharing your life with us.

Tena said...

Hi John,

Sending you all kinds of good wishes from way south of the border. Tomorrow is John Elder Robison Day.

Polly Kahl said...

See you tomorrow in the city John, you are going to be fabulous! Have fun and enjoy every minute!

Chumplet said...

ONE MORE SLEEP! ONE MORE!

The Anti-Wife said...

John,
I can wiggle my ears.

Tomorrow is the day. Your book is going to be a super best seller and I look forward to reading it. Best of luck to you!

Woof!

John Elder Robison said...

The confidence shown by all of you is touching. It's a bit scary, when you go into a big bookstore, to see how many really good books are out there, and I wonder how mine is going to stand out.

We'll see tomorrow . . .

One more sleep, as Chumplet says.

Wendy Roberts said...

John, wishing you a very happy and successful release day! Wooo Hooo the waiting is over!!

The Muse said...

Yeah!!! September 25th is finally here! Let the party begin...

Good Luck Tonight! All of your blog friends are chanting and cheering for you.


Woof! Woof! Woof! Woof! Woof! Woof! Woof!

ORION said...

Congratulations John!!!
The day has arrived!
I send Much Aloha your way...

Emily said...

I bought your book today and am excited to attend the signing event tonight at the Union Square BN!

Katie Alender said...

I got my copy! It was right up front at my bookstore. I'm looking forward to reading it.

Michelle said...

Hello, John,

I bought your book and devoured every word. My 9-year-old son has Asperger syndrome. Raising him has been an adventure.

Thank you so much for pointing out that people with Asperger's think in different ways. While my son is an honor student in school, he learns and expresses himself in a way that is completely unique. I often marvel at his unique way of solving a problem and his ability to "think outside the box" to problem solve.

He has had extensive speech therapy and occupational therapy, which included "sensory integration." Your comments regarding being petted remind me of that, as one of the techniques to calm an Asperger child and reintegrate the senses is to use brush therapy (using a very soft-bristle brush to stimulate the skin in a specific pattern). If you have not investigated it, you might find it interesting.

Ironically, my son wants to be an engineer when he grows up and build submarines. When he gets on an obsession, rather than discouraging it, we feed him. He will have a ravenous appetite for information, and we encourage him until he is satisfied with his knowledge. That is so important for people to know about "Aspergians."

Thank you again for writing this book. It is hopeful, inspiring, and enlightening. May your successes be many!

Michelle

Bee said...

John,
I wanted to thank you so much for writing a book. For years, I thought something was wrong with my son. March of 2007, my youngest son, Matthew, was diagnosed with Asperger's Disorder. At first, they wanted to put him on Redilyn,(hope I spelled that right). At the time, my husband was alive, we both protested against this. I wanted to ask you a couple of questions if I may. Did you ever have melt downs? Before he was diagnosed, he would hide under his blanket for hours. Did you ever want to throw things or tear things? Through your book, I'm understanding how he gets to the stages he is in. He is very smart child. He is 12 years old. He has an older brother that I'm trying to make or explain to him how it works. It is very hard sometimes to get the thought process of Matthew across to him. Any advice on that? I would really love to converse with you on this. I hope to hear from you. My email address is supermomma45@aol.com. It is also great to know you are living in my home state. I was born and raised in Florence, Mass. Thank you for taking the time to read this. Once again, thank you for your book.
Bee