Wednesday, July 11, 2007

Creating the audio book




Well, I started reading the abridged version of Look Me in the Eye today, at Armadillo Audio Group.

Charles Potter is directing me, and Peter Acker is the engineer.

The first shot shows me, reading.

The second shot is my brother and me together after he finished reading the foreward.







Come back tomorrow for photos of the studio and more details. I'm tired now. I have so far completed 57% of the required reading and hope to finish tomorrow or Friday.




9 comments:

Kim Stagliano said...

Sleep well. Eager to read more tomorrow, John.

Woof.

KIM

Drama Mama said...

The hardest working man in showbusiness.
xo

Polly Kahl said...

That is the absolute coolest John! Lots of pictures please!

Holly Kennedy said...

I love that you're doing the audio for the book. Make sure you take some time to celebrate when you're
finished.

And as you always say, WOOF!

Trish Ryan said...

Great pictures - too funny that you're wearing a t-shirt about your brother :)

Thinkulous said...

Hi, John. I've enjoyed a bunch of your posts. Thank you for spreading understanding of Asperger's through your writings.

I'm a novice psychotherapist almost done with my master's degree, and I'm currently working with teens with Asperger's for the summer. It's a big learning curve, and a fun, challenging job. I'm just meeting this disorder for the first time and getting oriented. I'd be pleased if you felt like reading/commenting on some of my posts on the experience so far -- for example, this one, and this one. No worries if you haven't time, I understand.

Kanani said...

It sounds exhausting, John.
Really.

Now, I want to know... why were the four hours with Julie so memorable?
;0)

Anonymous said...

Hmmmm... Notice that he still hasn't responded to your question Kanani?

Woof!

John Elder Robison said...

You know, Kanani, the thing that made the girl Julie memorable . . . we were two Americans, from the same part of the country, sort of thrown together in this third world airport, little more than a shed with a corrugated roof, waiting for a DC3, the kind that flew with live chickens in the passenger compartment . . . the whole thing was memorable.